Time to look out the window and act on climate, say farmers

30 August 2019.  Farmers are calling on the Federal Government to look out the window and take action on climate change, following the release of the latest emissions data which shows agricultural emissions are falling but national emissions climbing overall.

Data from the Quarterly Update of Australia's National Greenhouse Gas Inventory shows that emissions for the year to March 2019 are up 0.6 per cent on the previous year, despite agricultural emissions falling. 

Farmers for Climate Action CEO Verity Morgan-Schmidt said: “The agriculture sector is taking the lead on climate change, sequestering carbon in our landscapes and embracing emission reduction targets, including the red meat Carbon Neutral by 2030 goal. By allowing emissions in other sectors to continue to trend upwards the Federal Government is showing they still have work to do.” 

"Climate change isn’t an abstract future concept, and we don’t need to look far to see the impacts. As taps run dry in regional communities, and normally lush and fertile paddocks increasingly resemble a dustbowl, all we need to do is look out the window.”

 “It’s time for Government to put politics aside and stand up for the future of regional Australia.” 

Crookwell farmer and Farmers for Climate Action deputy chair Charlie Prell said: “Since the millennium drought I’ve done what I can to climate-proof my property, hosting wind turbines and refining my land management techniques. But the truth is that while Australian farmers are world leaders in adaptation, we’re not miracle workers. 

“Global warming is driving more frequent and extreme weather events - including droughts like the one farmers in Queensland and New South Wales are currently experiencing. 

“If the Federal Government truly cares about our nation’s future economic and social prosperity then it needs to start listening to - and acting on - the advice of climate change experts. They need to listen to the scientists and respond to the science, not to the hyperbole.

“Without action to cut the emissions which are fuelling global warming and a national strategy for climate change and agriculture, I am very concerned for the future of my farm and, indeed, the agricultural sector as a whole,” Mr Prell said.

Farmers for Climate Action is a movement of more than 5000 farmers, agricultural leaders and rural Australians working to ensure that farmers, who are on the frontline of climate change, are part of its solution.